Tendencies Toward Worry and Anger

Share:

The tendencies toward worry and anger are a part of our general human weakness that we all experience.[1] Their objects are incidental to the inclination. They are not the cause, and the inclinations remain even when there is no real thing that brings them about. Worry and anger can be triggered by something that is imagined or that is feared will happen, but often does not materialize. At times, the only thing that dispels them is when they are replaced by another worry or anger.

I experienced this with worry when I was growing up. It interfered with everything in my life during that time, and there was nothing that I knew of which could remedy it. I later learned that there was a remedy for it; but I did not start learning of it until I was in my late twenties. I didn’t know that religion was supposed to deal with this type of thing until I looked into the Bible for answers on how to arrive at inner peace; but getting to that point happened in steps that appeared to be coincidences; but it eventually became apparent that they were a progression toward an understanding of what would eventually work.

Seeking distractions did give me moments of relief; but these were the least effective for any long-term solution. At least, I can now point to things in the past that were not helpful for me. My first glimpse at what would eventually work was when I read the Biblical passage on the lilies of the field in Matthew 6:25-34. I was very surprised at what I read. It sounded like I wasn’t supposed to worry about anything in order to please God; but I was worried about everything at that time in my religiosity. I didn’t know how to reconcile this because there was no support for this Biblical understanding in the denomination that I grew up with; therefore, I put it aside for a period of time even though I was very attracted to it: but I did not forget it.

About ten years later when I started learning of the possibility of arriving at inner peace in Eastern Philosophy, it told me to reject all worry in order to arrive at inner peace and love. I was very attracted to this idea as I had previously been, and immediately attempted to adopt it into my life. During this time I attended a lecture by an Indian guru who said that all religions are basically the same; however, I didn’t remember this type of thing in the Christianity that I grew up with: but he got me curious. I eventually connected with a group that encouraged self-study of the Bible. I got my first concordance and immediately looked up the word ‘peace’; and that was the beginning of finding the instructions that would eventually bring me to my relationship with the God of peace.[2] The Bible told me to be anxious for nothing by casting all of my care on God in order to be exalted or lifted by Him.[3]

One night I decided to try this while I was walking down a street because I didn’t know of any church that taught this. Needless to say: it worked. Not only was there the peace of God, but also His strength to maintain it.

For more information and a FREE download of Peter Aiello’s entire book, visit http://www.hiddentreasure.website/.

Email comments to [email protected]. If this link does not work, please send your comment to this email address through your personal email provider.


[1] Cf. Matthew 26:41; Romans 7:14 thru 8:4; 5:6

[2] Cf. Philippians 4:9; 1Thessalonians 5:23; Hebrews 13:20-21

[3] Cf. 1Peter 5:5-7; Philippians 4:6-7; James 4:5-10; Proverbs 3:5-6; Matthew 6:25-34; 11:28-30; Psalms 37:7; 55:22; Isaiah 26:3-4; 30:15; 55:7-9; John 6:63; Romans 13:14; 6:13; 8:28; Galatians 5:16-25

Share:

Leave a Reply

Tendencies Toward Worry and Anger

Share:

The tendencies toward worry and anger are a part of our general human weakness that we all experience.[1] Their objects are incidental to the inclination. They are not the cause, and the inclinations remain even when there is no real thing that brings them about. Worry and anger can be triggered by something that is imagined or that is feared will happen, but often does not materialize. At times, the only thing that dispels them is when they are replaced by another worry or anger.

I experienced this with worry when I was growing up. It interfered with everything in my life during that time, and there was nothing that I knew of which could remedy it. I later learned that there was a remedy for it; but I did not start learning of it until I was in my late twenties. I didn’t know that religion was supposed to deal with this type of thing until I looked into the Bible for answers on how to arrive at inner peace; but getting to that point happened in steps that appeared to be coincidences; but it eventually became apparent that they were a progression toward an understanding of what would eventually work.

Seeking distractions did give me moments of relief; but these were the least effective for any long-term solution. At least, I can now point to things in the past that were not helpful for me. My first glimpse at what would eventually work was when I read the Biblical passage on the lilies of the field in Matthew 6:25-34. I was very surprised at what I read. It sounded like I wasn’t supposed to worry about anything in order to please God; but I was worried about everything at that time in my religiosity. I didn’t know how to reconcile this because there was no support for this Biblical understanding in the denomination that I grew up with; therefore, I put it aside for a period of time even though I was very attracted to it: but I did not forget it.

About ten years later when I started learning of the possibility of arriving at inner peace in Eastern Philosophy, it told me to reject all worry in order to arrive at inner peace and love. I was very attracted to this idea as I had previously been, and immediately attempted to adopt it into my life. During this time I attended a lecture by an Indian guru who said that all religions are basically the same; however, I didn’t remember this type of thing in the Christianity that I grew up with: but he got me curious. I eventually connected with a group that encouraged self-study of the Bible. I got my first concordance and immediately looked up the word ‘peace’; and that was the beginning of finding the instructions that would eventually bring me to my relationship with the God of peace.[2] The Bible told me to be anxious for nothing by casting all of my care on God in order to be exalted or lifted by Him.[3]

One night I decided to try this while I was walking down a street because I didn’t know of any church that taught this. Needless to say: it worked. Not only was there the peace of God, but also His strength to maintain it.

For more information and a FREE download of Peter Aiello’s entire book, visit http://www.hiddentreasure.website/.

Email comments to [email protected]. If this link does not work, please send your comment to this email address through your personal email provider.


[1] Cf. Matthew 26:41; Romans 7:14 thru 8:4; 5:6

[2] Cf. Philippians 4:9; 1Thessalonians 5:23; Hebrews 13:20-21

[3] Cf. 1Peter 5:5-7; Philippians 4:6-7; James 4:5-10; Proverbs 3:5-6; Matthew 6:25-34; 11:28-30; Psalms 37:7; 55:22; Isaiah 26:3-4; 30:15; 55:7-9; John 6:63; Romans 13:14; 6:13; 8:28; Galatians 5:16-25

Share:

Leave a Reply